Sunday, October 22, 2017 UTC

OCT 15, OCT 17 & 18: SUNDAY OF THE FATHERS OF THE 7TH ECUMENICAL COUNCIL (19TH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST) & COMMEMORATION OF LUKE APOSTLE – EVANGELIST (OCT 18TH)

48131.p OCT 15: DIVINE LITURGY – 10:30 AM; OCT 17: DIVINE LITURGY & CATECHISM – 11:00 AM; OCT 18: DIVINE LITURGY – 6:00 PM.

The Gospel reading today is Luke 8: 5-15,  The Parable of the Sower, in which we see that Jesus very explicitly says that the seed in the parable is the Word of God as it is sown or preached throughout the world. This parable tells us that there are some people on whom the Word of God has no effect, some people upon whom it has a superficial effect, some people who may have a passing acquaintance with the Word of God, and some people who have a depth that allows them to comprehend and receive the Word of God. The world has these different groups and today, we should realize that no amount of pleading can add anything to the work of the Holy Spirit. Jesus did not say to browbeat someone to accept the Word, but preached the Gospel and disciple those who believe. Many who call themselves Christians are not truly converted. While we do not condemn, we are to discern. We want to stay strong and focused so that we do not even temporarily get pulled off course from the Word of God.

The council is commemorated because it ended almost fifty years of iconoclast persecution and established the veneration of the holy icons as basic to the belief and spirituality of Christ’s Church. The Seventh Ecumenical Council met in 787 AD in Nicaea (present-day Turkey) to restore the veneration of icons which had been suppressed by the iconoclast Emperors Leo III (717 – 741) and his son, Constantine V (741 – 775).

On October 18th we commemorate the Apostle Evangelist Luke. Luke the Evangelist is one of the Four Evangelists or authors of canonical Gospels of Jesus Christ. Luke was a native of the Hellenistic city of Antioch in Syria. The early church fathers ascribed to him authorship of both the Gospel according to Luke and the book of Acts of the Apostles, which originally formed a single literary work, referred to as Luke-Acts. In the New Testament, Luke is mentioned briefly a few times, and referred to as a doctor in the Pauline epistle to the Colossians; thus he is thought to have been both a physician and a disciple of Paul. Considered a saint by Christians since the faith’s early years, he is believed to have died a martyr. He is considered as a patron saint of artists, physicians, surgeons, students and butchers.

 

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